ST GILES’, OXFORD

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Inns and Public Houses


St Giles’ Street has only two pubs surviving today (the Lamb & Flag and Eagle & Child); but here are the pubs that were there in the nineteenth century:

East side:

  • Dolphin Inn, on the site of 2–4 St Giles: first recorded in 1661, it closed in 1794 and was demolished.
  • Lamb & Flag at 12/13 St Giles: still survives as a pub
  • Windmill Inn at 24 St Giles: this ceased to be an inn in about 1861, and the building was demolished to make way for the southernmost part of the Mathematics Institute in 1968
  • Pheasant Inn at 30 St Giles: first recorded as an inn in 1792, it ceased to be a pub in 1956, but the building survives on the corner of Keble Road and is now an accountants office

West side

  • Eagle & Child at 48/49 St Giles: still survives as a pub
  • Hare & Hounds, 66 St Giles: first recorded as an inn in 1697, it ceased to be a pub in about 1850, and the building was demolished in 1867 and rebuilt the next year
  • Robin Hood at 78 St Giles: demolished in 1841 to make way for the Ashmolean Museum

Other pubs that were very near St Giles’ Street but not actually in it include:

  • South end of Woodstock Road (first known as St Giles Road and then as St Giles Road West): on the west side were the Waggon & Horses (at No. 25) and the Horse & Jockey (at No. 69); and on the east side were the Coach & Horses (just to the north of St Giles Church) and the Royal Oak (at No. 42). The Star (also known as the North Star) was at 11 Park Place on the Banbury Road, but is simply described as being in St Giles Road in 1839
  • Magdalen Street: Woodstock Arms (3) and the Bell & Crown (17) and the Royal Vulcan in Friars Entry

* Pigot’s Directory for 1830 lists a pub in St Giles' parish called the Chequers, with the landlord William Janaway: he is later listed as landlord of the North Star, which was in St Giles' Road West, and they may be one and the same.

St Giles’ home

Stephanie Jenkins

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