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Oxford Inscriptions: Former Dyson Perrins Laboratory, South Parks Road


Waterhouse inscription

BALLIOLENSIS
FECI
HYDATOECVS
O SI MELIVS

[I, Waterhouse, a Balliol man. made this.
O if only it were better!]

The Dyson Perrins Laboratory opened in 1915, and If you extract all the large letters (LLILICIDCVIMLIV) and reorder them from the largest in value to the smallest, they give the year the building was opened (but are not a proper roman numeral):

M (1000) + D (500) = 1500 + CC (100 twice) = 1700,
+ LLLL (50 four times) = 1900 + VV (5 twice) = 1910
+ IIIII (1 five times) = 1915

It was designed by Paul Waterhouse. HYDATOECUS is a Latinized Greek word meaning waterhouse and has been used to fit the chronogram: but should probably be HYDRATOECUS

Wikipedia: Dyson Perrins Laboratory

Dyson Perrins

P      R
EK   IN
R      S

[= PERKINS and PERRINS,
with duplicated letters omitted]

Charles William Dyson Perrins, the heir to the Lea & Perrins Worcester sauce company, endowed this laboratory. To find his surname in this inscription you have to read the PER down the left-hand side, and then the RINS down the right-hand side.

William Henry Perkin was the Waynflete Professor of Chemistry from 1912 to 1929. To find his surname, you have to read the PER down the left-hand side as before, then go horizontally across the middle to find the KIN.

This building ceased to be the organic chemistry laboratory in 2003 and is now the Oxford University Centre for the Environment.

Stephanie Jenkins